Federal labor law protects neutral (secondary) employers from becoming entangled in labor disputes between another (primary) employer and unions.  For most of the past decade, however, the NLRB has allowed unions to set up various displays – including an inflatable rat (otherwise known as “Scabby”) and an inflatable “fat cat” – near neutral employers’ premises

Previously, I wrote about the “preemption” problem with the Seattle Ordinance regulating ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft.  After Seattle passed the Ordinance, the federal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals quickly stayed the Ordinance pending an appeal.  The Ninth Circuit recently issued its opinion on the case.  Although the law remains stayed due to antitrust

This past Monday, April 30, marked the conclusion of a weeklong strike conducted by Columbia graduate students at the University’s campus. Timing, as people say, is sometimes everything – especially in an ongoing labor dispute – and here these graduate students scheduled a strike for the last – and busiest – week of the semester.

Normally, a union must obtain a majority of votes cast by employees in an election to be certified as the employees’ bargaining representative.  However, if the employer has engaged in serious violations of federal labor law during a union organizing drive, the NLRB can order it to immediately recognize and bargain with the union even

Undergraduate resident advisors usually wield a lot of power over university residence halls and those who occupy them. You likely know this already if you were ever a college freshman living in the dorms and received a write-up or warning from your RA. But, for those who do not know, RAs – who are often

Sometimes, using only one word can make all the difference between a lawful and unlawful statement. Washington University in Saint Louis learned this lesson the hard way when in late October 2017 Associate General Counsel for the NLRB’s Division of Advice Jayme L. Sophir instructed Region 14 to issue complaint, absent settlement, against the University.

Graduate students at most private universities have been allowed to unionize since the 2016 decision of the NLRB in Columbia University.  This decision was controversial because the employee status of graduate students has flip-flopped over time, depending on whether members appointed by Democratic or Republican Presidents controlled the Board.  Since 2016, the makeup of

Recently, a majority of employees at the news websites DNAinfo and Gothamist decided to join the Writer’s Guild union to bargain collectively over their terms of employment. In response, the owner of the websites decided to shut down its operations completely. This begs the question: can a business close its doors in response to its

With campaigns ongoing across the country aimed at raising the minimum wage at a state and local level, one might wonder, why not apply the same pressure on local governments to create their own labor laws? The battle between Uber and the City of Seattle demonstrates the complexities surrounding any attempt to regulate labor relations

Now that most, if not all, employees have smartphones with cameras in their pockets at all times, some employers have prohibited recording in the workplace. However, recent decisions by the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or “the Board”) have found that “no recording” policies are illegal under the National Labor Relations Act (“the Act”). In