General Labor Law News & Updates

The John Deere Co. Strike – Sign of the Times?

In case you missed it, a major battle between labor and management is playing out in the heartland.   On October 14, over 10,000 UAW-represented workers at John Deere Co. plants in Iowa, Illinois and elsewhere walked out following the expiration of their collective bargaining agreement. 

If enacted into law, the so-called Build Back Better reconciliation package (“BBB”) will drastically expand the remedial power of the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) effective January 1, 2022.  The BBB incorporates the penalty provisions the PRO Act, which is a pro-labor bill that had been pending in the Senate after passing the

In a recent guidance memorandum, Jennifer Abruzzo, the General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board, has announced her intention to consider college athletes as employees under federal labor law.   The implications of this memo are far-ranging and include the possibility of union representation of college athletes and unfair labor practice charges against universities

According to news reports, the upcoming budget reconciliation bill will likely contain some portions of the PRO Act, which is a piece of proposed pro-union legislation.  As detailed in a prior post, the PRO Act would dramatically change federal labor law.  The details of the reconciliation bill are not yet public, but reportedly

The Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday that a California regulation permitting labor organizations a “right to take access” to an agricultural employer’s property to solicit support for unionization violated the constitutional rights of those employers.

The case, Cedar Points Nursery et al. v. Hassid et al., No. 20-107, arose from union organization efforts

Congress may be on the cusp of passing legislation that would transform labor law in dramatic ways. This proposed law has potentially dire consequences for private-sector employers nationwide.

The Protecting the Right to Organize Act (the PRO Act) would essentially rewrite the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) to favor unions and employees seeking to organize

NLRB Acting General Counsel Peter Ohr is moving swiftly to put his stamp on national labor policy.   Last week, my partner Andrew MacDonald blogged about Ohr’s withdrawal of a complaint that had challenged the use of a neutrality agreement by an employer and a union.  Ohr also rescinded several General Counsel Memoranda issued by his

In his first few days on the job, Acting General Counsel of the NLRB Peter Sung Ohr has withdrawn a complaint that had challenged the use of a neutrality agreement by an employer and union.  This early move by the Acting GC indicates the direction that he will take in attempting to change the course

In an unprecedented action that delighted organized labor but sounded alarm bells for employers, in one of his first acts, President Biden  fired the General Counsel and Deputy General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board.   On January 25, the White House appointed Peter Sung Ohr to serve as Acting General Counsel.   Mr. Ohr long

The NLRB’s General Counsel recently issued a memo that demonstrates his hostility toward neutrality agreements.  Generally, neutrality agreements contain a promise from an employer that it will remain neutral in a union organizing campaign.  These agreements often contain other provisions, such as allowing unions access to employer property to address employees and providing unions with